Leg Cramp Covid | Which Magnesium Is Best For Muscle Cramps?

Leg cramps are a common problem that affects the feet, calves, and thigh muscles. They involve immediate, painful, and involuntary reductions of a leg muscle.

They often occur while a person is resting or sleeping. They can go in a few seconds, but the average duration is 9-10 minutes. They can leave tenderness in the muscle within 24 hours after.

COVID-related lag cramp pains can range from being mild to quite debilitating, particularly when they occur fatigue. This muscle pain stops them from doing their day-to-day tasks.

People with COVID-19 experience unusual leg cramps. Many people with aches and pains will not have COVID-19.

I had earlier shared Covid Muscle Spasms: All You Should To Know. I hope you read the post.

 

Table of Contents

Which magnesium is best for muscle cramps?

Magnesium citrate can be the most effective type if you want to try a supplement. But, if you’re magnesium deficient, there can be additional benefits from increasing your intake of this nutrient and other remedies for leg cramping that can help.

I also wrote a tutorial on What Vitamins And Minerals Are Good For the Brain? that you can follow.

Causes

In some cases, people don’t know why leg cramps happen, although there are many theories.

Some study recommends that muscle fatigue and nerve dysfunction may play an important role. Sleeping with the foot stretches out and the calf muscles shortened can trigger night cramps.

Sometimes leg cramps are caused by this underlying condition relating to the nervous system, metabolism, or hormones. 

Here are a few articles to check out:

Home remedies

The American Academy of Orthopaedic suggests the following:

  • Stop the activity that caused the cramp.
  • Use cold packs on muscles.
  • Hold your leg in the stretched position until the cramp stops.
  • Stretch and massage
  • Apply heat to muscles that are tense or tight.

Many people use magnesium to reduce muscle cramps. A 2020 survey that looked at older adults decided that they were incredible to benefit from this treatment.

Stretching before bedtime may help, but the evidence is limited.

Treatment

No medication prevents leg cramps.

If a sharp cramp leaves a muscle feeling tender, an over-the-counter painkiller may help.

The Food Administration advises people not to use this, as it can have dangerous side effects.

There is insufficient evidence that exercise and stretching, blockers, calcium channels, carisoprodol, and vitamin B-12 may help. However, multivitamins can be of  use during pregnancy.

There is no evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs calcium or potassium are of benefit.

Must read: Exercise During Covid

Exercises and stretches

If there is no cause, leg cramps will get better without treatment. Try the following stretches:

  • Hamstring muscle stretch
  • Calf 
  • Quadriceps muscle stretch

Prevention

  • Support the toes when lying down and asleep by propping up the feet with a pillow.
  • Keep bedding loose to help stop the feet and toes from pointing down during sleep.
  • Wear proper footwear during the day, particularly if a person has flat feet.

Keep yourself fit by getting exercise every day. If a person exercises, they should make their program is suitable and that their progress is gradual. Avoid training for prolonged periods, and remember to warm up before starting.

When to see a doctor

Leg cramps are not caused for concern, but sometimes they can indicate a problem. If cramps are frequently happening, it may be a good idea to seek medical advice.

The doctor carries out tests to try to identify the cause. For example, if the person takes medications that can trigger cramps, the doctor adjusts the dose or drug.

Conclusion

Leg cramps are a problem that usually happens for no identifiable reason. However, massaging and stretching the muscle can often bring relief.

In many cases, however, there can be a cause that needs medical attention. For example, if cramps are frequent, consider consulting a doctor.

Still have any questions about neck and shoulder pain during covid-19? Ask in the comments section!

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