List Of Diabetes Medications 2021 | Type 1 Diabetes Covid

Diabetes is a disease of blood sugar levels. It happens because insulin in your body does not work ultimately. As per result, your body struggles to control blood sugar levels.

There are two types of diabetes. First, people with type 1 diabetes with insulin injections need diet and activity planning to avoid treatment complications.

A person manages type 2 diabetes with lifestyle patterns, injections, oral medication, and insulin if other unsuccessful treatments.

There are medications available for diabetes that it can be challenging to know which is best. This article will explain the types of medication available and their effects on the body.

I had earlier shared How Do You Get Gestational Diabetes?: All You Should to Know I hope you read.

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Table of Contents

Medications for type 1 diabetes

Treatment for type 1 diabetes involves insulin. Then, it replaces insulin and blood sugar levels steady.

I have also wrote article: Which Hormonal Deficiency Causes Diabetes Insipidus?

People also self-inject insulin under the skin or, if  hospitalized, a doctor injects insulin into the blood. It is available as a powder that people can breathe in. However, some people use insulin pumps, which are small devices that send insulin by tubes injected into the skin.

Insulin injections, by how they act, how long they last. The purpose is to mimic how the body would produce insulin to promote adequate energy intake throughout the day.

There are many types of insulin.

Rapid-acting injections take within 5 to 15 minutes but last for a time of 2 to 5hours:

  • lispro (Humalog)
  • insulin aspart (NovoLog)
  • glulisine (Apidra)

Short-acting injections take between 30 minutes and 1 hour and last for 3 to 7 hours:

  • regular insulin (Humulin R and Novolin R)

Long-acting injections take 1 or 2 hours and last for between 14 and 23 hours:

  • glargine (Toujeo)
  • detemir (Levemir)
  • degludec (Tresiba)

Intermediate-acting injections take 1 to 4 hours and last for 12 to 17 hours:

  • insulin isophane, also called Humulin N and Novolin N

Type 1 Diabetes Covid

According to the CDC is reporting at this time, people with type 1 or diabetes might be at an increased risk for illness from COVID-19. Still, because COVID-19 is a new disease, we don’t know as we’d like to about how medical conditions increase the risk for illness from COVID-19.

It’s important to remember that people with a type of diabetes can vary in their age, difficulties they’ve developed, and how they have managed their diabetes. People with diabetes-related health problems have worse outcomes if they contract COVID-19 than people with diabetes who are healthy, whichever type of diabetes they have.

Medications for type 2 diabetes

Insulin can help manage high blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes, but doctors prescribe it when treatments have no effect.

Women with type 2 diabetes that become pregnant use it to overcome the effects of the condition on the fetus.

Also see: Pregnancy Tips | Pregnancy Care

Several of the drugs have a combination of effects. For example, if a person needs treatments to manage their glucose levels, they may require insulin treatment.

Sulfonylureas

Sulfonylureas drugs increase the flow of insulin into your blood by the pancreas. As a result, people use the newer medicines, as they are less to cause adverse effects:

  • Glimepiride (Amaryl)
  • Glyburide (Micronase, DiaBeta, Glynase)
  • Glipizide (Glucotrol)

Now, doctors prescribe sulfonylureas less frequently than they did in the past. It is because they can cause very low blood sugar, which causes additional health problems.

Meglitinides

Meglitinides enhance insulin secretion. These also improve the body in releasing insulin during meals and include:

  • Nateglinide (Starlix)
  • Repaglinide (Prandin)

Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors

Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors cause carbohydrates to be absorbed slowly. As a result, it lowers glucose levels in the blood after meals.

  • Acarbose (Precose)
  • Miglitol (Glyset)

Incretin mimetics

Incretin mimetics are medications that mimic the hormone incretin, which stimulates insulin relief after meals. These include:

  • Exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon)
  • Dulaglutide (Trulicity)
  • Liraglutide (Victoza)
  • Lixisenatide (Adlyxin)
  • Semaglutide (Ozempic)

Alternatives

The United States Food Administration has allowed one ergot alkaloid, bromocriptine, for type 2 diabetes.
Doctors do not usually recommend or prescribe this medication.

People use bile acid sequestrants to control cholesterol levels, but they can help steady blood sugar levels. The only colesevelam has approval for type 2 diabetes.

Developments

People can’t take insulin orally because the abdomen breaks down the hormone. It means the ways for insulin to reach the bloodstream are injections or insulin pumps.

Diabetes researchers have explored ways, but these methods require study before broader use.

Potential future delivery methods for insulin include:

  • by nasal spray across the mucous membranes, the covers inside the nose
  • patches on the skin

Surgeons could transplant insulin-producing pancreatic cells from donors. In addition, some people benefit from the progress of study within islet cell transplantations.

Personalized medicine is a promising area for the treatment of diabetes. Better grouping of the diseases and targeted treatment result from genetics and significant data developments.

Which medications do you use from above list to cure diabetes? Let me know in the comments below.

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